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Your opinion matters to us. It’s why we consider consultation and feedback vital to our work at Historic Environment Scotland. 

The most recent opportunities to have your say are displayed below, through consultations and surveys. Alternatively, search for opportunities to have your say

Share your views to help inform and improve our work and decision making at Historic Environment Scotland. 

Details of consultations held prior to 2020 can be found on our website. Visit our publications section for our responses on other organisations’ consultations. 

Closed activities

  • Designating Bell's Sports Centre, Perth

    Designating Bell's Sports Centre, Perth

    We propose to designate Bell's Sports Centre as a listed building . Bell’s Sports Centre, opened in 1968, is one of Scotland’s earliest purpose-built, indoor sports centres. The domed sports hall has special architectural and historic interest as an exceptional surviving example of a new building type that developed in the second half of the 20th century. Designed to accommodate a range of...

    Closed 23 February 2024

  • Designating Crawick Multiverse, Sanquhar

    Designating Crawick Multiverse, Sanquhar

    We propose to designate Crawick Multiverse on the inventory of gardens and designed landscapes . Created from a former coal mine by the renowned cultural theorist and landscape designer, Charles Jencks (1936–2019), Crawick Multiverse is an outstanding example of early- 21 st century land art in Scotland. The design uses landforms, water features and stone arrangements on a...

    Closed 19 February 2024

  • Designating Livingston Skatepark

    Designating Livingston Skatepark

    We propose to designate Livingston 'Livi' Skatepark as a listed building . The skatepark is one of a handful of surviving skateparks from the late 1970s – early 1980s in the UK. It has architectural interest for its pioneering design and the innovative approach of its architect, Iain Urquhart. Retaining its public park setting, the skatepark is an important survival of...

    Closed 9 February 2024

  • Designating the former Cumbernauld Cottage Theatre

    Designating the former Cumbernauld Cottage Theatre

    We propose to designate the former Cumbernauld Cottage theatre as a listed building . Built in the 1700s as part of the Cumbernauld House estate, this row of cottages was adapted for use as a community theatre in 1962. The building has special architectural interest as an example of 18th century estate workers' cottages. It has historical interest for its pioneering role...

    Closed 21 December 2023

  • Outline Strategic Plan for Holyrood Park

    Outline Strategic Plan for Holyrood Park

    Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey on the Outline Strategic Plan for Holyrood Park. Gathering public views is important to help deliver a new future for the Park that reflects community aspirations, the needs of the City and the inherent value and sensitivity of Holyrood Park. The Draft Plan was prepared in 2022-2023 by Historic Environment Scotland (HES). It has...

    Closed 19 December 2023

We asked, You said, We did

See what we've consulted on. See all outcomes

We asked

From 21 November 2023 to 9 February 2024, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on a proposal to list Livingston ‘Livi’ Skatepark.

The skatepark is one of a handful of surviving skateparks from the late 1970s – early 1980s in the UK. It has architectural interest for its pioneering design and the innovative approach of its architect, Iain Urquhart. Retaining its public park setting, the skatepark is an important survival of public enterprise architecture by Livingston Development Corporation and has social historical interest as an icon of the Scottish skate and bike scene. 

Through Citizen Space, we invited members of the public to tell us if they agreed with the proposed designation and if they had further comments to make.

We consulted directly with West Lothian Council as the planning authority.

This consultation followed on from an earlier engagement exercise in April-May 2023 in which we received 557 responses to our online survey asking for comments and information to help inform our assessment of the skatepark (Share your views on Livi Skatepark).

Our selection guidance for designation and the policies we work to are published in the Designations Policy and Selection Guidance document. 

You said

We received a total of 184 responses including one written response from the Local Authority and 183 responses to our online survey.

The overwhelming majority of people who responded expressed strong support for the designation. No one raised issues that brought into question the cultural significance of the site for designation.

We have reported in more detail on the consultation in our Report on Handling, which can be downloaded from the Heritage Portal or from the bottom of this page.

Comments from the online survey are published in full (where we have appropriate permissions).

All of the relevant reports can be downloaded from the bottom of this page.

We did

After considering the comments received during consultation, we have

We have published a Report on Handling for this case at Heritage Portal. This can also be downloaded at the bottom of this page.

We asked

From 30 November 2023 to 21 December 2023, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on a proposal to list the former Cumbernauld Cottage Theatre.

Built in the 1700s as part of the Cumbernauld House estate, this row of cottages was adapted for use as a community theatre in 1962. The building has special architectural interest as an example of 18th century estate workers' cottages. It has historical interest for its pioneering role as a theatre within the developing identity of Cumbernauld New Town during its formative years and beyond. 

Through Citizen Space, we invited members of the public to tell us if they agreed with the proposed designation and if they had further comments to make.

We consulted directly with North Lanarkshire Council as the planning authority and owner of the site, and another interested party.

Our selection guidance for designation and the policies we work to are published in the Designations Policy and Selection Guidance document. 

You said

We received a total of 306 responses, including two responses from the Local Authority and 14 other written responses. We received 290 responses to our online survey.

The overwhelming majority of people who responded expressed strong support for the designation. No one raised issues that brought into question the cultural significance of these sites for designation. Many of the comments provided further information about the social historical interest of this site.

We have reported in more detail on the consultation in our Report on Handling, which can be downloaded from the Heritage Portal or from the bottom of this page.

Comments from the online survey are published in full (where we have appropriate permissions). The report can be downloaded from the bottom of this page.

We did

After considering the comments received during consultation, we have

We have published a Report on Handling for this case at Heritage Portal. This can also be downloaded at the bottom of this page.

We asked

From 12 September to 17 October 2023, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Tollcross Fire Station in Edinburgh as a category B listed building.  

The building was constructed in 1986 as the as the central control unit for the Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service. It was designed by the Department of Architectural Services at Lothian Regional Council and is a notable example of public-sector architecture in Scotland from the 1980s.

Tollcross is an exceptional example of a fire station for its late-20th century date and incorporates an unusual, curved drill tower to the rear. Its striking design is both highly functional and artistic, taking elements of traditional Scottish architecture and re-interpreting them in a playful way. It is an early and important example of Postmodern architecture in Scotland.

You said

We received two responses to the consultation, one in favour of the listing and one against. The respondents provided the following comments:

The Twentieth Century Society noted that they were strongly in support of the proposed listing as the building is “…an excellent and significant exemplar of early post-modernist expression in Scotland.” They made further comments supporting the special architectural and historic interest of the building and provided more information about the artist responsible for the relief sculpture.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (the owners) objected to the listing proposal as they had concerns that the consents that listing may incur could compromise or delay necessary changes to the building for operational purposes. They also included individual reactions from station personnel. Two noted they were in favour of listing, and one noted they were not.

We did

We considered the responses carefully and further considered the special interest of the building.  

We have now listed Tollcross Fire Station in Edinburgh as a category B listed building. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final Report of Handling is also available.  

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.