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We asked, You said, We did

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We asked

From 10 May to 31 May 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the Library and Arbuthnot Museum in Peterhead as a category C listed building.

The library and museum building is constructed in pink Peterhead granite and is architecturally well-detailed. Built between 1891 and 1893 and designed in the ‘Free Renaissance’ style, it includes oriel windows, curvilinear gables and a prominent corner tower with a domed and finialled roof. It is one of the earliest Carnegie public libraries in Scotland (and the world) and its plan form is indicative of early public library design. Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received one response to consultation which confirmed the building is not subject to any active planning applications. No objections were raised to the proposed listing of the building.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed the Library and Arbuthnot Museum as a category C listed building. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final Report of Handling is also available.

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.

We asked

From 7 to 28 April 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Carsethorn pier as a scheduled monument.

The site is a nationally important monument that was found to meet our criteria for designation: Criteria. Carsethorn Pier is an archaeological feature that makes a significant contribution to our understanding and appreciation of the maritime heritage of southwest Scotland, and its contribution to the history of 19th century emigration.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal: Carsethorn Pier - Portal.

You said

We received 13 responses which contributed to our knowledge of the monument and also provided insight into how the pier is valued.

All of the responses were in favour of designating Carsethorn Pier as a scheduled monument. Each question related to our assessment of the monument in intrinsic, contextual and associative aspects were scored as "strongly agree" by 10 responses and "agree" by the remaining 3 responses.

We received additional comments, all supportive of the proposal and recognising the importance of the pier. Some comments from respondents include:

  •  "It gives a physical link into both emigration and maritime trade in the 19th Century."
  •  "Unique Solway feature makes the Carse beach instantly recognisable. Such strong history of shipping and emigration."
  • "It is important to keep relics of the past when Carsethorn was a trading centre."
  • "The pier is a striking visual component of the beach in front of the village today giving it context with a changing landscape."
  • "Basically the visual site of the jetty is a memory to the thousands who left for the New World. It is also a constant reminder of a seafaring/fishing history that mustn’t be lost."
     

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now scheduled Carsethorn Pier as a nationally important monument.

Download the Report of Handling from our Heritage Portal: Carsethorn Pier - Designation

We asked

From 15 March to 5 April 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Duntocher Trinity Parish Church as a category B listed building. 

This building is a relatively early and architecturally distinctive example of a post-war church, designed and constructed soon after the war to replace the previous church on the site that was destroyed during the Clydebank Blitz of 1941. Duntocher Trinity Parish Church is traditional in plan form, but its design indicates strong Continental influences, such as its use of parabolic arches and its high-quality brick and concrete construction.  

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal  

You said

We received three responses to consultation which raised no objections to the listing of the church. The response from West Dunbartonshire Council planning authority provided detailed information about the setting of the church and its relative special interest.  

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed Duntocher Trinity Parish Church at category B.  We have made some changes as a result of the comments received. Our assessment and the listed building record have been amended to highlight the special interest of the setting of the church. 

The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal and the final Report of Handling is also available. 

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed. 

Listing does not mean that Duntocher Trinity Parish Church should stay as it is forever, or even that it must always remain a church - many buildings can be repurposed for different uses. 

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website:  

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications.