We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

From 9 to 30 August 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate land at St Michael’s Knowe, Coldingham, Scottish Borders and surrounding area as a scheduled monument.

We were interested to find out what information you had about the site and also to gather views about some or all of the site being designated as a scheduled monument.

You said

We received nine responses, which contributed to our knowledge of the area and also provided insight into how the site is valued.

Most of the responses were in favour of designating the land at St Michael's Knowe as a scheduled monument. Our questions focussed on your relationship to the site, any knowledge you may have that was useful and which areas you felt should be scheduled. Eight out of the nine responded that they felt all the areas outlined in the consultation should be scheduled.

We received additional comments, most supportive of the proposal and recognising the importance of the site. Some comments from respondents include:

"I'm delighted that the area around Coldingham Priory and St Michael's Knowe is under consideration for listing as a scheduled monument."

"The area is of major historical significance and requires further archaeological investigation. Any developments prior to this would be extremely detrimental."

We had a single negative comment: 

"Will it make any difference to the usual train of nonsense and waste as every other designated site other than the ones HES charge to get in to?"

We did

We note the negative comment above. We schedule to recognise our most significant sites and monuments. This provides for the protection and preservation of the cultural significance of scheduled monuments through a series of consents, compliance, enforcement and monitoring procedures managed by us. Being a scheduled monument does not confer any right of public access.

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we will now take forward a designation assessment. We will use the information supplied to inform our designation assessment for St Michael's Knowe and the surrounding area. Once this assessment has been completed, we will consult on our proposed decision. 

We asked

From 22 June to 13 July 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the harbour in Brora as a category C listed building.  

Brora Harbour was built in 1813-14 to import and export raw materials and finished products relating to the local coal mining, salt-panning, fishing and brickwork industries in Brora. 

You said

We received no responses to consultation.  

We did

We have now listed Brora Harbour as a category C listed building. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final Report of Handling is also available.  

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.  

We asked

From 8 June to 29 July 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the former Chivas Brothers Headquarters Building in Paisley as a category C listed building.  

The building was constructed in 1962-64 as the headquarters of the Chivas Brothers company, one of the world’s leading producers of high-quality blended Scotch whisky.

It was designed to look like an authentic old Scottish country house, and this reflected the brand image that the company marketed to the world. The historicist style and high-quality neo-classical detailing is rare for a building of this date, and the building has remained largely unchanged since it was constructed.

You said

We received 32 responses to the consultation, 28 of which were in favour of the listing. The vast majority of comments stated that they would like to see the building retained and incorporated into the design for the new Paisley Grammar School.

The four objections, which included one from Renfrewshire Council, were mainly concerned that the additional costs and consents that listing may incur, could jeopardise its future reuse. The Council queried the special interest of the building, with the exception of the main façade. There were also some concerns about maintenance costs, safety issues and the potential impact on the completion of the new school. One response noted they were against listing the building, as it would celebrate a company that abandoned the town.

We did

We considered the responses carefully and we have discussed the proposed designation further with Renfrewshire Council. After further consideration of the special interest of the building, we have excluded the interior from the listing.  

We have now listed the former Chivas Brothers Headquarters Building in Paisley as a category C listed building, excluding the interior. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final Report of Handling is also available.  

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.  

We asked

From 7 June to 28 June 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the Palacerigg Visitor Centre as a category B listed building.   

The Visitor Centre at the Palacerigg Country Park, Cumbernauld contains a mural in the foyer by Alasdair Gray (1934⁠–⁠2019). Alasdair Gray painted the mural in 1974 having been commissioned by naturalist and Director of the Country Park, David Stephen. The theme of the mural is natural and human ecology, and it shows Scottish wildlife in an idealised countryside scene.  

Glasgow-born artist and writer Alasdair Gray is a cultural figure of national importance. Best known for his 1981 novel Lanark, he studied design and mural painting at Glasgow School of Art and was commissioned to paint murals in and around Glasgow from the 1950s until the 2010s. The mural at Palacerigg Visitor Centre is amongst the earlier surviving examples of his visual art. 

You said

We received 40 responses to the consultation, all of which were in favour of the listing.  

The majority of responses commented on Gray’s significance as an artist, author and poet and wished to see the mural protected. Many responses noted that other Gray murals had been lost and that this highlighted the increasing rarity and vulnerability of Gray’s surviving murals. Some responses emphasised the significance of the mural work as reflection of the pioneering work of naturalist, Palacerigg Country Park Warden and commissioner of the work, David Stephen. 

We received a number of responses which included personal reflections of visits to Palacerigg Country Park where the mural in the Visitor Centre was admired and appreciated. We also received some responses from individuals who knew or had met Alasdair Gray and recalled aspects of his personality and working style. 

One response raised concerns about the application of the listing to the entire Palacerigg Visitor Centre building and how this might impact future works to the building. 

We did

We considered the responses carefully and we have discussed the proposed designation further with North Lanarkshire Council. We clarified that the listing of the wider Palacerigg Visitor Centre building is intended to protect the mural which is embedded in the fabric of the building. 

We have now listed the Palacerigg Visitor Centre in Cumbernauld as a category B listed building. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final  Report of Handling is also available.   

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.   

We asked

From 12 May to 12 June 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) asked people about the potential special architectural or historic interest of the 1960s Cumbernauld Town Centre.

We did this because  we were asked to consider designating the 1960s Cumbernauld Town Centre as a listed building. We launched the public consultation to help to inform our listing assessment.

Built 1963-72, the building in the town centre was designed as a ‘megastructure’ – a single structure with a range of different uses – and included shops, offices, civic buildings, a bus station, hotel and apartments. At the time of its construction, it won recognition as an outstanding example of town centre planning and modern innovation.

In more recent years, the building has divided opinion and has been altered extensively. Now there is a proposal to regenerate the site currently occupied by the megastructure to provide a multi-purpose town hub and other community and commercial developments.

You said

We were delighted to have over 2,000 responses to our consultation. We were very pleased to hear from local residents with over three quarters of respondents noting they were from Cumbernauld.

The responses included views about the special architectural and historic interest of the Town Centre and you also told us about how you valued the site and whether you think it should be recognised and protected in the future. You also told us about your aspirations for the redevelopment of the town centre.

Some comments from respondents include:

  • "While I acknowledge that perhaps it was at one stage of architectural significance, the building is no longer fit for purpose, it’s in very poor state and just unsightly." 
  • "I feel like the town centre is a famous landmark. It was built for a specific reason and has been allowed to fall into disrepair over the years by the owners. I feel that the main part of the town centre should be kept and repaired and the new hub should be built around the existing building. I have lived in Cumbernauld for 40 years and the centre has always been a talking point. It's also important to protect the architecture of the original new town central hub."
  • "It’s an eyesore, not attractive, doesn’t support safe-access to shops and other facilities, it’s a carbuncle."
  • "The building is a ‘mega structure’ which was considered to be a leader when it was built. It is a concept which has only failed because it has not been properly managed and maintained. It still has fantastic potential given that it is such a powerful structure with many years of life ahead of it."

We did

We are now considering the case for listing and will analyse and publish a consultation report as part of this process. We expect to reach a view on listing in early autumn 2022. 

Link to our Portal: http://portal.historicenvironment.scot/decision/500003493
Link to our Designation Policy and Selection Guidance
Find more information on how we make our decisions at: https://www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support/listing-scheduling-and-designations/listed-buildings/listing-process/#overview_tab.

We asked

From 10 May to 31 May 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the Library and Arbuthnot Museum in Peterhead as a category C listed building.

The library and museum building is constructed in pink Peterhead granite and is architecturally well-detailed. Built between 1891 and 1893 and designed in the ‘Free Renaissance’ style, it includes oriel windows, curvilinear gables and a prominent corner tower with a domed and finialled roof. It is one of the earliest Carnegie public libraries in Scotland (and the world) and its plan form is indicative of early public library design. Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received one response to consultation which confirmed the building is not subject to any active planning applications. No objections were raised to the proposed listing of the building.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed the Library and Arbuthnot Museum as a category C listed building. The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal, where the final Report of Handling is also available.

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.

We asked

From 7 to 28 April 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Carsethorn pier as a scheduled monument.

The site is a nationally important monument that was found to meet our criteria for designation: Criteria. Carsethorn Pier is an archaeological feature that makes a significant contribution to our understanding and appreciation of the maritime heritage of southwest Scotland, and its contribution to the history of 19th century emigration.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal: Carsethorn Pier - Portal.

You said

We received 13 responses which contributed to our knowledge of the monument and also provided insight into how the pier is valued.

All of the responses were in favour of designating Carsethorn Pier as a scheduled monument. Each question related to our assessment of the monument in intrinsic, contextual and associative aspects were scored as "strongly agree" by 10 responses and "agree" by the remaining 3 responses.

We received additional comments, all supportive of the proposal and recognising the importance of the pier. Some comments from respondents include:

  •  "It gives a physical link into both emigration and maritime trade in the 19th Century."
  •  "Unique Solway feature makes the Carse beach instantly recognisable. Such strong history of shipping and emigration."
  • "It is important to keep relics of the past when Carsethorn was a trading centre."
  • "The pier is a striking visual component of the beach in front of the village today giving it context with a changing landscape."
  • "Basically the visual site of the jetty is a memory to the thousands who left for the New World. It is also a constant reminder of a seafaring/fishing history that mustn’t be lost."
     

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now scheduled Carsethorn Pier as a nationally important monument.

Download the Report of Handling from our Heritage Portal: Carsethorn Pier - Designation

We asked

Dh’fhaighnich sinne

Eadar 16 A’ Mhàirt agus 6 An Giblean 2022 bha Àrainneachd Eachdraidheil Alba (HES) a’ sireadh bheachdan air a’ mholadh againn ìre clàraidh an togalaich seo atharrachadh bho B gu A agus eadar-theangachadh Gàidhlig a chur ris an t-seòladh clàraidh aige.

Air a togail ann an 1901-04,  ’s e eaglais paraiste fhollaiseach agus mòr-mhaisichte, air a dealbh le Uilleam Tennant agus Fred V Burke, a tha ann an Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille. Chaidh a togail airson coimhearsnachd Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu a fhrithealadh. Tha ùidh shònraichte innte airson a beairteas de mhion-obair cloiche snaighte, taobh a-staigh a tha an ìre mhath slàn, a follaiseachd air aon de phrìomh shràidean Ghlaschu, agus airson a h-ùidh mar fhòcas airson adhradh anns a’ Ghàidhlig.

Gheibhear tuilleadh fiosrachaidh air ar  Heritage Portal.

You said

Thuirt sibhse

Fhuair sinn aon fhreagairt dhan cho-chomhairleachadh nach do thog gearan a thaobh an eaglais a chlàradh. Bha am freagairt aig Urrasairean Coitcheann Eaglais na h-Alba, mar shealbhadairean an togalaich, a’ toirt fainear gu robhas a’ dol a reic an togalaich agus nach robh co-dhùnadh ann fhathast a thaobh ciamar a bhiodh seirbheisean Gàidhlig air an tairgsinn ann an Glaschu no am biodh iad co-cheangailte ri aon thogalach. Chuir na h-Urrasairean cuideachd thugainn tomhais de cheartachaidhean a thaobh teacsa na h-aithisg. 

We did

Rinn Sinne

An dèidh meòrachadh air na beachdan a fhuair sinn tron cho-chomhairleachadh, tha sinn a-nise air an ìre clàraidh aig Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille / St Columba Gaelic Church atharrachadh gu Ìre A. Tha sinn cuideachd air seòladh a’ chlàraidh atharrachadh gu ainm Gàidhlig na h-Eaglaise a bhith na phàirt dheth agus cheartaich sinn dà mhearachd fhìrinneach anns an Aithisg Làimhseachaidh. 

Tha clàr nan togalaichean clàraichte ri fhaighinn air ar Heritage Portal  agus tha an Aithisg Làimhseachaidh dheireannaich cuideachd ri fhaighinn.

Tha ar n-àrainneachd eachdraidheil daonnan ag atharrachadh. Chan eil clàradh a’ cur bacadh air atharrachadh ach tha e a’ leigeil le caractar sònraichte structair a bhith air a ghabhail a-steach nuair a tha atharraichean san amharc.

Chan eil clàradh a’ ciallachadh gu feum Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille / St Columba Gaelic Church fuireach mar a tha i gu bràth no fiùs gu feum i a bhith na h-eaglais gu bràth – faodaidh mòran thogalaichean a bhith air an ath-chleachdadh airson feumannan eadar-dhealaichte.

Gheibh sibh an tuilleadh a-mach mu chlàradh san leabhran againn  Scotland’s Listed Buildings no air an làraich-lìn againn:

  • Ciamar a tha am pròiseas clàraidh ag obrachadh?
  • Dè tha ann an clàradh?
  • Dè tha clàradh a’ ciallachadh dha sealbhadairean?

Tha mion fhiosrachadh  a bharrachd mu phròiseasan Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) air an làraich-lìn againn a bharrachd air fiosrachadh mu chuir a-steach air a shon.

Tha stiùireadh a bharrachd anns an t-sreath fhoillseachaidhean againn Managing Change .

We asked

From 16 March to 6 April 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to change the category of listing of this building from B to A and to add a Gaelic translation to its listing address.

Built in 1901-04, Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille / St Columba Gaelic Church is an ornate and prominent parish church designed by William Tennant and Fred V Burke to cater for the Gaelic-speaking community in Glasgow. It is of special interest for listing for its wealth of carved stonework detailing, its largely complete interior, its prominence on one of Glasgow’s main streets, and for its cultural and historic interest as a focal point for worship in the Gaelic language.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received one response to consultation which raised no objections to the listing of the church. The response from the General Trustees of the Church of Scotland, as owners of the building, noted that the building was to be marketed for sale and that the issue of how Gaelic services will be provided within Glasgow, and whether this will be linked to a specific building, has not yet been determined. The General Trustees also provided some corrections to the text of the report.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now changed the category of listing of Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille / St Columba Gaelic Church to category A.  We have also changed the listing address to include the Gaelic name of the building, and corrected two factual errors within the Report of Handling. 

The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal and the final Report of Handling is also available. 

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed. 

Listing does not mean that Eaglais Ghàidhlig Chaluim Cille / St Columba Gaelic Church should stay as it is forever, or even that it must always remain a church - many buildings can be repurposed for different uses. 

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website:  

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications. 

 

We asked

From 15 March to 5 April 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Duntocher Trinity Parish Church as a category B listed building. 

This building is a relatively early and architecturally distinctive example of a post-war church, designed and constructed soon after the war to replace the previous church on the site that was destroyed during the Clydebank Blitz of 1941. Duntocher Trinity Parish Church is traditional in plan form, but its design indicates strong Continental influences, such as its use of parabolic arches and its high-quality brick and concrete construction.  

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal  

You said

We received three responses to consultation which raised no objections to the listing of the church. The response from West Dunbartonshire Council planning authority provided detailed information about the setting of the church and its relative special interest.  

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed Duntocher Trinity Parish Church at category B.  We have made some changes as a result of the comments received. Our assessment and the listed building record have been amended to highlight the special interest of the setting of the church. 

The listed building record is available on our Heritage Portal and the final Report of Handling is also available. 

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed. 

Listing does not mean that Duntocher Trinity Parish Church should stay as it is forever, or even that it must always remain a church - many buildings can be repurposed for different uses. 

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website:  

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications. 

We asked

From 7 March to 28 March 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to list the Former St Rollox Locomotive Works in Springburn at category B.

First built in 1854-56 then remodelled and enlarged in the 1880s, St Rollox Works is a rare surviving example of a major centre for locomotive manufacture and repair. Consisting of 12 adjoining workshops, the building retains much of its historic character and fabric, including 19th century structural ironwork and internal fixtures. It is now the only building of this type to survive in Springburn, Glasgow - formerly one of the world's main centres of locomotive construction. 

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received a total of 17 responses to consultation.

Sixteen responses were in favour of designating St Rollox as a listed building.

The comments contributed to our knowledge of the building and our understanding of how St Rollox is valued.

The former locomotive works was described as an important piece of history representing a golden age of British engineering, part of Scotland’s industrial and railway heritage, and an important part of the history of Glasgow. They were noted as providing a window into the lives of thousands of workers. Comments highlighted the overwhelming external and internal architecture of the rail sheds and provided information on the use of the site during the Second World War. A number of respondents expressed hope that an appropriate use for the site could be found so that its heritage could be preserved.

One comment queried the potential for change to the building for alternative use, including the potential acceptability of sub-dividing the space, covering some of the tracks and pits and demolishing two of the smaller sheds.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed the Former St Rollox Locomotive Works at category B.

Listed building record for Former St Rollox Locomotive Works (LB52603)

Our Report of Handling provides more detail on the comments received. This can be downloaded from our Heritage Portal

We have made some additional changes as a result of the comments received – our assessment and the listed building record have been amended to note the role of the locomotive works for military manufacture during the Second World War.

In response to the comments about future use, we provided general comments on the principles of adapting the internal space and replacing roof materials and indicated that we would be happy to engage in more detailed discussions about adaptive reuse once development proposals are more advanced.

The storage sheds flagged at consultation were once used for copper and iron and form part of and inform our understanding of the former locomotive works and therefore should be included within the listing. 

More Information

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed. 

Listing does not mean that the Former St Rollox Locomotive Works should stay as it is forever - many buildings can be repurposed for different uses. 

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website:  

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications. 

We asked

From 14 December to 25 January 2022, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Dundee Repertory Theatre as a category A listed building.

The building is an exceptional example of a late-20th century theatre design that was found to meet our criteria for designation. Despite being restricted by a very tight budget and a small site, the building is distinguished for its design quality and complements the historic setting of Tay Square. It is also one of only three major examples of new theatres that were purpose-built in Scotland during the theatre building boom of the 1950s-80s.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received 12 responses which contributed to our knowledge of the building and also provided insight into how the theatre is valued.

All of the responses were in favour of designating Dundee Rep as a listed building.

Dundee Rep was described as a unique and cleverly designed building that is striking, both inside and out. Overall people thought it was very successful in its function as a theatre, particularly due to its well organised layout within the constrained site. They felt that it positively contributes to the character of Tay Square and is an important cultural hub that is at the heart of the city’s arts quarter.

There was one concern that listing may prevent improvements being made to the building in terms of accessibility. One response highlighted that its continued use as a repertory theatre, or ‘rep’, is very rare within the context of Scotland and the wider UK, as many former ‘reps’ now operate as touring houses. The local authority also provided additional information about the external lighting scheme and sculptural banner pole in Tay Square.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed Dundee Repertory Theatre at category A.

Listed building record for Dundee Repertory Theatre

Download the Report of Handling from our Heritage Portal 

We have made some changes as a result of the comments received – our assessment and the listed building record have been amended to highlight the rarity of Dundee Rep as a repertory theatre.

More Information

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change, but it does allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.

Listing does not mean that the Dundee Rep should stay as it is forever, or even that it must always remain a theatre - many buildings can be repurposed for different uses.

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website: 

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications.

We asked

From 10 November to 22 December 2021, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on revisions to the inventory battlefield record for the Battle of Pinkie (September 1547).

The Battle of Pinkie was fought across the area of coastal plain now mainly agricultural land and the settlements of Musselburgh, Wallyford, Carberry and Whitecraig in East Lothian. Pinkie is believed to be the largest single battle ever fought in Scotland in terms of the numbers of combatants involved.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received four responses. None of the responses called into question the importance of the battlefield. They raised points in relation to the detail of the record, covering aspects such as the events of the battle, surviving features in the landscape, documentary evidence, and use of maps to illustrate the battle. 

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have made updates to the inventory record.

We also undertook further research to take account of feedback. On the basis of this work, we consider that the existing inventory area of interest defined by the boundary does not include sufficient land at the top of Falside Hill to account for one of the possible locations of the English army. To remedy this, we are proposing a revision to the south-eastern boundary.

We are organising a second consultation to provide opportunities for stakeholders who may be affected to comment on this proposed change.

Download the Report of Handling and comment on the second consultation from our Heritage Portal

We asked

From 31 August to 21 September 2021, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate Alford Heritage Museum (former Alford Auction Mart) as a category A listed building.

The building is a very rare example of a largely complete early 20th century former livestock auction mart that was found to meet our criteria for designation. Of timber construction, the building retains its sale ring, adjoining offices and cattle byres and it contributes to our understanding of agricultural life in this part of Aberdeenshire during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Further details can be accessed on our Heritage Portal.

You said

We received three responses which contributed to our knowledge of the building and also provided insight into how the building and museum are valued.

Alford Heritage Museum was described as atmospheric, magical, a unique insight into farming life over 100 years, and an important hub for the village. There were also comments about how the museum’s collection enhanced our understanding of the building.

We received new information about the attached 19th century waterwheel, which was a donation to the museum in 1993.

Overall, there was support for the protection of industrial historic buildings through designation.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed the Alford Heritage Museum at category A.

Listed building record for Alford Heritage Museum 

Download the Report of Handling from our Heritage Portal 

More Information

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website: 

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications.

We asked

From 26 July to 6 September 2021, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our draft 'HES Grants Framework 2021 Onwards' document which has been developed to guide our future grants activity.

You said

We had 63 responses to the survey from a wide variety of stakeholders which, overall, reflected a strong level of support for the proposals outlined in the Grants Framework.

We did

Since the survey closed on 6 September, we have been collating all the responses and using the feedback from these to inform the final version of the ‘HES Grants Framework 2021 Onwards’.

The Public Consultation Summary report is now available to read and sets out the background to the consultation, provides a summary of the responses and explains how the feedback has been considered in producing the final version of the Framework

The final version of the ‘HES Grants Framework 2021 Onwards’ document is also now available to download.

We asked

From 13 April to 31 May 2021, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on Scotland’s modern garden and designed landscape heritage. We asked for nominations of sites to include in our new programme of work, ‘Designed Landscapes of the Recent Past’.  

Background 

We think gardens and designed landscapes dating from 1945 to the early 2000s are currently underrepresented in our publicly available records. These include the online database for the National Record of the Historic Environment (Canmore) and the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes

This programme will champion Scotland’s modern garden and designed landscape heritage through recording sites, improving online records and considering the most important sites for designation.  

We aim to develop our understanding of modern gardens and designed landscapes – including their survival and significance – and to promote knowledge about this important part of our historic environment.  

You said

We had 30 responses to the survey. Most were from private individuals, but we also received responses on behalf of organisations, public bodies or charities and from private businesses. 

All respondents agreed that gardens and designed landscapes of the recent past were part of Scotland’s historic environment and that they should be protected in the same way as older sites. Most respondents considered that modern designed landscapes were not adequately represented in our online records and were sometimes under threat.  

Comments noted that sites of this period were not always valued as much as buildings or natural landscapes and could be vulnerable to loss, alteration or problems with maintenance.  

Other comments noted that these sites were part of Scotland’s story and that recording them and telling their history was important for future generations. Several respondents told us that we should consider landscape broadly, and to include sites related to housing, industry and infrastructure in our programme. 

Respondents were able to nominate up to 3 sites for us to consider as part of the programme. 

We received a total of 47 nominations. Once repeat nominations are subtracted, this gives us a total of 42 different sites from a total of 15 local authority areas across Scotland. The local authority areas with the largest numbers of nominations were Glasgow City Council and Edinburgh City Council. 

We did

Since the close of the online survey on 31st May, we have begun research on the nominated sites. We will consider these sites alongside those brought to our attention through internal conversations in HES, a stakeholder webinar in April 2021, and through the ScoMo project (https://scomolandscape.wordpress.com/portfolio/).  

After reading the comments and nominations from the survey, we have decided to publish a more detailed report on the results of the survey (Update - 07 October 2021 - This has now been published with a link to the document below).

Next steps 

  • Select a small number of nominated sites for recording in 2021-2022 

We would welcome any further feedback or nominations that you might have. 

You can contact the project team on modernlandscapes@hes.scot.  

We asked

From 22 September to 15 December 2020, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on new draft guidance ‘Talking About Heritage’.

Background

This document is part of an ongoing review of historic environment policy guidance, following on from the What's Your Heritage? campaign and the launch of the Historic Environment Policy for Scotland (HEPS) in May 2019.

What's Your Heritage? asked people from all over the country how Scotland’s places, buildings and monuments should be recognised and celebrated. Feedback from over 2,000 responses to the campaign told us that people wanted to achieve recognition for the heritage that matters to them.

Talking About Heritage is part of the HES response to this.

 

What is the guidance about?

Talking About Heritage is intended to be used as a tool by anyone with an interest in exploring and talking about heritage. The guidance aims to equip people to have new – sometimes difficult – conversations about our places, people and traditions.

We wanted to find out if the Talking About Heritage guidance would help you to investigate, to share and celebrate, and to achieve recognition for the heritage that matters to you.

You said

We had 34 replies to the survey as well as written feedback which we received from a range of interested individuals, organisations, public bodies, charities and local authorities.

The draft Talking About Heritage guidance was generally well received. It was felt to be a useful and comprehensive resource. Comments included suggestions about what additional content could be included, improved signposting, accessibility - particularly around language and aims - and the need for the final product to be easy to navigate and use.

We were told that we should:

  • ensure simple and clear language throughout
  • be clearer about the purpose of the guidance
  • be clearer who the guidance is for and manage expectations of what it will help to achieve
  • publish the guidance as an interactive web-based resource
  • make sure the guidance is accessible for deaf users
  • keep the content and the links up to date

We did

After considering the all of the comments and suggestions received, we have updated the guidance with:

  • clear and simple language
  • clearer information about who the guidance is for and how it might be used
  • increased signposting and more information about other relevant organisations and resources

Based on your feedback, we have also:

  • explored how best to publish Talking About Heritage as an online and interactive resource
  • looked at how we can produce the guidance with British Sign Language (BSL) content
  • agreed a regular review period to keep the guidance up to date

Next steps:

We are currently working on updating the draft guidance and incorporating your feedback. The final guidance, an online resource, is planned for publication this summer.

We asked

During October and November 2020, we hosted a public consultation to test and trial our existing outcomes in terms of ambition and relevance.

Our purpose in carrying out the survey was to test people's views on our existing outcomes as well as provide feedback on what equality focus our work should take for the next four years.

To support the survey, collaborative discussions were held with external agencies, such as Forth Valley Sensory Centre and Young Scot, as well as internal sessions with our Youth Forum and LGBT+ employee network.

 

You said

We received 58 responses with 51 responding as individuals.

Organisations who responded included: Deaf Scotland; Hidaya; Heritage Trust Network; Empower Women for Change, National Trust for Scotland; and Stonewall.

There was positive feedback on Historic Environment Scotland (HES) activities to date. Most respondents:

  • agreed that the activities highlighted in the survey did make a difference to the lives of people with protected characteristics.
  • were satisfied with the number of activities HES was engaged in although the levels of satisfaction were lowest in activities on race and D/deaf.
  • agreed that HES was delivering a broad range of activities showing broad support as well as room for improvement.

Recurring themes in the responses received related to:

  • concerns over the growth in hate crime in wider society
  • comments on how the pandemic is disproportionally impacting people with protected characteristics including their socio-economic status and access to services
  • encouragement for HES to keep working with others, learning, and improving
  • a lot of interest in our staff networks and external partnerships and call for more information and updates
  • desire for HES to lead in sectoral change, seeking out, initiating and pursuing debate
  • desire for HES to set equality recruitment and training targets and work towards them.

We did

In analysing the responses, three categories emerged in thinking about equalities and HES:

  • Our Society
  • Our services
  • Our people.

Using these three categories we extracted the following key learnings:

Our Society:

Emphasis on ensuring that equality is integral to understanding our contribution to Scotland’s economic, social, environmental, and cultural wellbeing.

Identification of a need and expectation that HES lead sectoral change.

Recognition of the value of collaboration and partnership with communities and other organisations, including academic partnership for research and evidence base.

Our Services: 

Focus on access, diversity, and inclusion. 

The impact of COVID–19 restrictions on access has been raised as a significant concern and calls to maintain and improve access as we enter the recovery phase and reimagine our work following the pandemic.

The need to draw out untold or hidden histories considered as important issues to be addressed, specifically building on our successful initiatives, and sharing learning wider across HES and the sector. 

Our People:

Our Board, employees and volunteers are committed to do and learn more about how their role can support our equality practice.

The consultation highlighted calls to improve the diversity of our workforce by, for example, setting recruitment targets, targeting the recruitment of interns and apprenticeships, and harnessing the interest and influence of our people through our employee networks. It also highlighted the importance of diversity in our leadership team and Board.

There were calls for more visible and clearer internal leadership on equality issues with some comments still resonating with concerns raised in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. It is important to embed equality within our decision making, planning, and resourcing processes. HES should lead sectoral change and empower and enable our employees in this.

These responses have helped to shape the HES Equalities Outcomes 2021-25 which is available on our website:

We asked

From 8 August to 28 August 2020, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the former Langside Synagogue in the Crosshill area of Glasgow, as a category C listed building.

The building is rare surviving example of a purpose-built synagogue in Scotland and was found to meet our criteria for designation. The use of traditional Eastern European folk-art style elements is particularly rare and reflects the synagogue’s early 20th century congregation. It is of significant historical interest for what it can tell us about the development of the Jewish community in Glasgow in the early 20th century.

Download our assessment on the reasons for listing on the Historic Environment Portal.

You said

We had an overwhelming response, with over 840 individuals and groups from all over the world contacting us in support of listing. The level of interest shown both locally and internationally for this building and Scotland’s Jewish heritage was unprecedented. It was especially important to hear your thoughts about the special architectural and historic interest of the building and we took this into account in our decision making.

A large number of the responses showed concerns about the future of the building and the possibility that it might be demolished or privately developed.

We did

After considering the comments received during the consultation, we have now listed the former Langside Synagogue at category C.

The listed building record can be accessed on our Historic Environment Portal.

 

More Information

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings or find out more on our website: 

Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC) and Conservation Area Consent (CAC) processes, as well as information on how to apply. There is additional guidance in our Managing Change series of publications.

We asked

From 26 June to 17 July 2020, Historic Environment Scotland (HES) sought views on our proposal to designate the Kingston Bridge, which forms part of the M8 motorway in Glasgow, as a category B listed building.

The launch of the consultation coincided with the 50th anniversary of the opening of the bridge, which was opened as part of Glasgow’s inner-city ring road on 26 June 1970.

The Kingston Bridge is a dramatic piece of structural engineering that was nominated for listing by Transport Scotland and found to meet our criteria for designation. Forming a key part of Scotland’s first motorway, it transformed both the physical and social fabric of Glasgow and is an important example of major urban planning of the post-war period.

Whilst the bridge has had social and environmental implications, particularly on the neighbouring areas, it is of special architectural and historical interest as it is among one of the most significant and high-profile bridge projects completed in Scotland during the 1960s and 70s.

The only criteria for listing a building is whether it is of special architectural or historic interest. Factors such as proposed future use are not taken into account.

Download our assessment on the reasons for listing on the Historic Environment Portal.

You said

We had a substantial response, with 69 written comments received from a range of interested people and groups, both locally and nationally. There were also many comments on social media platforms and a high-level of coverage in the press.

The vast majority of those who responded were not in favour of the listing. The level of detail about the issues and concerns has given us a greater depth and understanding of the context of the Kingston Bridge and how it is viewed by people in Glasgow and beyond.

It was especially important to hear your thoughts about the special architectural and historic interest of the bridge and we took this into account in our decision making.

We did

We carefully considered the responses and we have had further discussion with Glasgow City Council and Transport Scotland. While we did not find that any comments put into question the special architectural or historic interest of the bridge, we have made changes as a result of the comments received and clarified what listing means.

We have:

  • Reconsidered the category of listing and listed the bridge at category C, not category B to reflect the comments about the special architectural or historic interest of the bridge.
     
  • Amended our assessment and the listed building record to capture wider views about the bridge and its impact on the surrounding communities when it was constructed.
     
  • Increased our communications around listing, what being designated as a listed building means and the increasing importance of places constructed after the Second World War.

We have now listed the Kingston Bridge at category C and the listed building record can be accessed on our Historic Environment Portal http://portal.historicenvironment.scot/designation/LB52554.

Find out more about why we list modern buildings.

 

More Information

Our historic environment is always changing. Listing does not prevent change and it will not affect any potential proposal to change the name of the bridge. What listing does is allow for a structure’s special character to be taken into account when changes are proposed.

Listing does not mean that the bridge should stay as it is forever, or even that it must always remain a motorway - many bridges can be repurposed for different uses, such as the High Line in New York and the Seoul Skygarden.

You can find out more about listing in our booklet, Scotland’s Listed Buildings.

The Advice and Support section of our website provides further information on the listing process and about what listing is. Our website also has more detail about the Listed Building Consent (LBC)  processes, as well as information on how to apply.